Why the future of work is human: Building The Lucky Country #7

The future of work isn’t scary, but it is misunderstood. Our ground-breaking research tells us how human skills are hugely under supplied and as a result – skills, rather than occupations or qualifications – are the job currency of the future. These trends in job markets aren’t alarming, they’re liberating, as the boring, repetitive work will be done by robots, leaving the more challenging and interesting work for humans.

In the seventh edition of our Building the Lucky Country series, developed to prompt debate and conversations on the biggest issues facing the Australian economy, we take a different look at the future of work and explore how what we do at work is changing, as are the skills we need to succeed. Launched in June 2019, we dispel the myths about robots, work, casual jobs, skills, and much more, so we can clearly see how the future is actually full of opportunity.

Today’s jobs are increasingly likely to require the cognitive skills of the head rather than the manual skills of the hands. Yet something new is also happening: Jobs increasingly need us to use our hearts – the interpersonal and creative roles, with uniquely human skills like creativity, customer service, care for others and collaboration.

How we structure the future of work will say a lot about us as a society, and the decisions we make now will be a key driver of our economic success.

As Rob Hillard, our Chief Strategy and Innovation Officer says, “Maintaining our prosperity as a nation needs to include fostering creativity, innovation and productivity in the workplace. This new research presents a view that the future of work in Australia will very much be about people and their unique interpersonal and creative skills.”

However, our research shows that the average worker is missing around two of the 18 critical skills employers need to fill a position. So how we structure the future of work will say a lot about us as a society, and the decisions we make now will be a key driver of our economic success. The opportunity is large. If we make better choices about our work, our workers and our workplaces, we could boost the nation’s economic welfare by $36 billion annually, to pave the path to prosperity for all Australians.

Our market leading pro bono program

Deloitte Australia won an ABA100 award at the Australian Business Awards 2018 for our leading role as a provider of pro bono services. The awards recognise Australia’s business, innovation and technology leaders.

In FY19, Deloitte provided $13.83 million in pro bono or ‘low bono’ services to clients, an 18% increase on the previous year. This further cements our role as a leading provider of pro bono services in Australia.

Announcing the award, Deloitte’s Gerry Wilde, Director of Responsible Business and The Deloitte Foundation, said: “Our firm’s reputation for clear, honest and different thinking means our pro bono support is highly sought after and regarded by not for profit and community organisations throughout Australia. Our pro bono commitment is an activation of our purpose, which is to make an impact that matters in our communities.”

The award coincided with our major role in delivering the incredible Invictus Games, held in Sydney in October 2018. The Games represented our biggest pro bono undertaking to date.

$13.8m

In FY19, Deloitte provided $13.83 million in pro bono or ‘low bono’ services to clients, an 18% increase on the previous year.

Counting the real cost of cancer in young people

Each year more than 1,000 adolescents and young adults (AYAs) are diagnosed with cancer in Australia. Deloitte Access Economics worked on a low bono project for CanTeen to calculate the cost to the economy of cancer in young Australians. For those diagnosed each year, it was estimated to be $1.3 million per person over a lifetime.

In December 2018, Deloitte presented its findings to the Third Global Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Congress in Sydney. CanTeen’s CEO, Peter Orchard, said Deloitte’s research had been incredibly important in helping convince governments to fund clinical trials and provide better services for young people affected by cancer.

Presenting the research at the Congress, Deloitte Partner Lynne Pezzullo said it “shows policy makers the magnitude of the problem for young people and their families”.

Peter Orchard said the research had attracted significant interest internationally.

Other countries are talking to us about the [Deloitte] report and saying, ‘Wow, we need that right here in our country’, so [it’s a] huge benefit to us.

Peter Orchard

CanTeen CEO

1,000

Each year more than 1,000 adolescents and young adults (AYAs) are diagnosed with cancer in Australia.